How To Cover Your Business Risks

Staten Island commercial bank cites merit in insuring against havoc

 

STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. -- Business owners can avail themselves of many kinds of insurance coverages, and Victory State Bank suggests that one way to look at them is their being akin to investing in the enterprise's well-being.

There are several good lists of coverage types, with summaries of their purposes. One example is a roundup by the federal Small Business Administration (SBA).

Insurance coverage is available for every conceivable risk your business might face, SBA says. Cost and amount of coverage of policies vary among insurers. An insurance agent or broker can advise you on the exact types of insurance you should consider purchasing.


GENERAL LIABILITY 

Business owners purchase general liability insurance to cover legal hassles stemming from an accident, injuries and claims of negligence. Policies protect against payments as the result of bodily injury, property damage, medical expenses, libel, slander, the cost of defending lawsuits, and settlement bonds or judgments required during an appeal procedure.

PRODUCT LIABILITY

Companies that manufacture, wholesale, distribute, and retail a product may be liable for its safety. Product liability insurance protects against financial loss as a result of a defect that causes injury or bodily harm. The amount of insurance to purchase depends on the products you sell or manufacture. A clothing store would have far less risk than a small appliance store, for example.


PROFESSIONAL LIABILITY

Business owners providing services would consider professional liability insurance (also called errors and omissions insurance and/or malpractice insurance). This coverage protects your business against malpractice, errors, and negligence in provision of services to your customers. Depending on your profession, you may be required by the state to carry such a policy. For example, physicians are required to purchase malpractice insurance as a condition of practicing in certain states.


COMMERCIAL PROPERTY

Property insurance covers everything related to the loss and damage of company property due to a wide variety of events such as fire, smoke, wind and hail storms, civil disobedience and vandalism. The definition of "property" is broad, and includes lost income, business interruption, buildings, computers, company papers and money.

Property insurance policies are in two basic forms: (1) all-risk policies covering a wide-range of incidents and perils except those noted in the policy; (2) peril-specific policies that cover losses from only those perils listed in the policy.



Examples of peril-specific policies include fire, flood, crime and business interruption insurance. All-risk policies generally cover risks faced by the average small business, while peril-specific policies are usually purchased when there is high risk of peril in a certain area. 


HOME-BASED BUSINESS

Contrary to popular belief, homeowners' insurance policies do not generally cover home-based business losses. Depending on risks to your business, you may add riders to your homeowners' policy to cover normal business risks such as property damage. However, homeowners' policies only go so far in covering home-based businesses and you may need to purchase additional policies to cover other risks, such as general and professional liability.


A compilation by Forbes adds a few more:

PROPERTY INSURANCE

If you own your building or have business personal property, including office equipment, computers, inventory or tools, consider purchasing a policy that will protect you if you have a fire, vandalism, theft, smoke damage, etc. You may also want to consider business interruption/loss of earning insurance as part of the policy to protect your earnings if the business is unable to operate.



BUSINESS OWNER'S POLICY (BOP)

A business owner policy packages all required coverage a business owner would need. Often, BOPs will include business interruption insurance, property insurance, vehicle coverage, liability insurance, and crime insurance . Based on your company’s specific needs, you can alter what is included in a BOP. Typically, a business owner will save money by choosing a BOP because the bundle of services often costs less than the total cost of all the individual coverages.



COMMERCIAL AUTO

Commercial Auto Insurance protects a company’s vehicles. You can protect vehicles that carry employees, products or equipment. With commercial auto insurance you can insure your work cars, SUVs, vans and trucks from damage and collisions.  If you do not have company vehicles, but employees drive their own cars on company business, you would need non-owned auto liability to protect the company in case the employee does not have insurance or has inadequate coverage.  Many times the non-owned can be added to the BOP policy.



WORKER'S COMPENSATION

This is for employees injured on the job. It provides wage replacement and medical benefits to those injured while working. In exchange for these benefits, the employee gives up his rights to sue his employer for the incident. It is very important for a business owner to have worker’s compensation insurance, Forbes says, because it protects you and your company from legal complications. All state laws require you to have workers compensation if you have W2 employees.  Penalties for non-compliance can be stiff.



DIRECTORS AND OFFICERS

This type of insurance protects the directors and officers of a company against their actions that affect the profitability or operations of the company. If a director or officer of your company, as a direct result of actions on the job, is in a legal situation, this type of insurance can cover costs or damages lost as a result of a lawsuit.



DATA BREACH

If the business stores sensitive or non-public information about employees or clients on their computers, servers or in paper files, it is responsible for protecting that information.  If a breach occurs either electronically or from a paper file a Data Breach policy can protect against the loss.


Other overviews of the variety of  business coverages further add to the list:

CASUALTY INSURANCE

Some insurers will lump property and casualty insurance together and refer to the coverage as “property and casualty” insurance. In fact, some contend that  “packaged” policies of property and casualty are often the best purchase a business owner can make. However, to have an understanding of the difference between the coverage, I will discuss this as a separate type of insurance. Casualty insurance insures against loss or damage to the business.

BUSINESS INTERRUPTION

Business interruption insurance (also see Property Insurance, above) insures against loss or damage to the cash flow and profit of a business caused by the business being unable to operate because of interruption. The easiest example is to think about a critical piece of machinery being struck by lightning. The repairs to the machine may be covered by other coverage such as property or casualty insurance. But, if you can’t make widgets for three months, then there is no replacement of that income without this coverage.

'SCRIPTED' POLICIES

It could very well be that your business is so unique to have need for coverage that is a mixture of some of the coverage listed above or something written specifically for your particular risk. One can think of some actresses, actors, or sports stars that have had legs insured at some point in there careers. This would be an example of a “scripted” policy.

BOILER AND MACHINERY

Boiler and machinery insurance, sometimes referred to as "equipment breakdown" or "mechanical breakdown coverage," provides coverage for the accidental breakdown of boilers, machinery, and equipment. This type of coverage usually will reimburse for property damage and business interruption losses. For example, this coverage would cover fire damage to computers.

DEBRIS REMOVAL


This covers the cost of removing debris after a fire, flood, windstorm, etc. For example, a fire burns your building to the ground. Before you can start rebuilding, the remains of the old building have to be removed. Your property insurance will cover the costs of rebuilding, but not of removing the debris.

BUILDER'S RISK

Builder's risk insurance covers buildings while they are being constructed. For example, a Builder's risk policy would cover losses if a windstorm takes down your partially constructed condominium complex.

GLASS INSURANCE


Glass insurance covers broken store windows and plate glass windows.

INLAND MARINE

Inland marine insurance covers property in transit and other people's property on your premises. For example, this insurance would cover fire-damage to customers' clothing from a fire at your dry cleaning business.

ORDINANCE OR LAW COVERAGE

Ordinance or law insurance covers the costs associated with having to demolish and rebuild to code when your building has been partially destroyed (usually 50 percent). For example, your three-story building is 100 years old. A flood destroys the basement and first two stories. Because more than 50 percent of your building has to be rebuilt, a local ordinance requires that the building be completely demolished and rebuilt according to current building codes. Property insurance covers only the replacement value, not the upgrade.

TENANT'S COVERAGE

Commercial leases often require tenants to carry a certain amount of insurance. A renter's commercial policy covers damages to improvements you make to your rental space and damages to the building caused by the negligence of your employees.

CRIME

Crime insurance covers theft, burglary, and robbery of money, securities, stock, and fixtures from employees and outsiders.

FIDELITY BONDS

A bonding company covers losses due to a bonded employee's theft of business property and money.

 

 

About Victory State Bank

VSB Bancorp, Inc. (OTCQB: VSBN) is the one-bank holding company for Victory State Bank. As Staten Island, N.Y.’s only community-based commercial bank, Victory State Bank operates five full-service locations on the Island: The main office in the community of Great Kills, and branches in the communities of West Brighton, St. George, Dongan Hills and Rosebank.  For additional information, Victory State Bank may be reached at 718-979-1100 or visited online at www.victorystatebank.com.

Media Contact: 

Relevant Public Relations, LLC

Headquarters: 718‑682‑1509

Mobile: 917‑715‑8761

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

  

Staten Island Realtors’ ‘Pack To School’ Program

In 12th Year of Donating Supplies to Kids

 

Staten Island Business Bank Highlights local Realtors’ annual effort

 

STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. – Victory State Bank applauds the initiative of the Staten Island Board of Realtors (SIBOR) as it works to provide children with supplies for the new school year.

Seven hundred elementary school students at PS 78, Tompkinsville, will be starting the school next month with an essential assortment of brand new classroom supplies, courtesy of the Staten Island Board of Realtors (SIBOR).

Now in its 12th year, SIBOR’s “Pack To School” program has provided thousands of backpacks stocked with marble notebooks, a ruler, crayons (24-count), washable markers, pocket folders, glue sticks, pencils and a pencil box to Island school children.

“A different school each year is designated to receive the supplies for the start of the fall term,” said Laird Klein, president of SIBOR. “Both from the standpoint of the recipients and the donors, this is one of SIBOR's most gratifying activities.”

This year, SIBOR’s goal is to provide at least 700 backpacks filled with student essentials, said Linda F. Smith, SIBOR director of membership and coordinator of SIBOR’s Pack to School program.

The supplies represent donations and merchandise from the Island's real estate professionals and arrive at SIBOR's offices to be apportioned into backpacks.

Putting the supplies into the backpacks becomes a large effort with participation by Realtors, family members, students seeking community-service hours, and other volunteers, Ms. Smith said.

In addition to the supplies, each child is presented with a “Best Wishes for a Successful School Year” note.

On Sept. 5, Realtor volunteers from across the Island will spend the morning personally distributing supply-filled backpacks to the students.

Anyone who would like to make a donation, or learn more about “Pack To School,” can contact Ms. Smith, at 718-928-3230.

Items may be dropped off at all participating Realtor offices and at SIBOR headquarters, 1535 Richmond Ave.,  Suite No.3, Bulls Head.

 

About The Staten Island Board of REALTORS® (SIBOR)

The Staten Island Board of REALTORS® (SIBOR) is the largest not-for-profit trade association in Staten Island, N.Y. 

SIBOR exists to enhance the ability and opportunity of its members to conduct their business successfully and ethically; and to promote the preservation of the public’s right to own, transfer and use real property.

Comprised of over 1,600 members, SIBOR serves real estate agents, brokers and affiliated professionals throughout the borough and surrounding areas. 

SIBOR is the provider of the Staten Island Multiple Listing Service Inc. (SIMLS), which works as a clearinghouse through which more than 250 local real estate firms exchange information on properties they have listed for sale. Together, its members participate in over 3,000 real estate transactions every year.

All SIBOR members belong to the New York State Association of REALTORS® (NYSAR) and the National Association of REALTORS® (NAR).

SIBOR may be reached at 718-979-0007 and viewed online at www.sibor.com. SIBOR may also be visited on Facebook at “Staten Island Board of Realtors” and on Twitter via @SIBOR.

 

 

About Victory State Bank

VSB Bancorp, Inc. (OTCQB: VSBN) is the one-bank holding company for Victory State Bank. As Staten Island, N.Y.’s only community-based commercial bank, Victory State Bank operates five full-service locations on the Island: The main office in the community of Great Kills, and branches in the communities of West Brighton, St. George, Dongan Hills and Rosebank.  For additional information, Victory State Bank may be reached at 718-979-1100 or visited online at www.victorystatebank.com.

Media Contact: 

Relevant Public Relations, LLC

Headquarters: 718‑682‑1509

Mobile: 917‑715‑8761

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

Business Succession Needs a Plan

Staten Island commercial bank urges owners to focus on keeping it going

 

STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. – One of a business owner's most important challenges is continuity.

Whether a key person retires or passes or becomes incapacitated, Victory State Bank urges owners to have a succession plan for their enterprise to stay in business.

Studies have shown that the overwhelming reason that businesses fail in the next generations is the lack of a succession plan.

In a family business, sometimes a parent-child relationship also needs to be addressed, if not healed. When there are several siblings, their respective interest in being part of the business also can be an issue.

The matter of succession is especially germane for a family business that has lasted through a couple of generations but where the next heir apparent has strong opinions at odds with its existing nominal head. Think of a son or daughter wanting to manage the enterprise in a different way, and disagreements ensuing with the father.

A succession plan usually is carefully nurtured in the way it gradually unfolds. Victory Bank stresses that owners should begin a plan now and not procrastinates.

Roles can be tried or modified as individual strengths or weaknesses emerge without losing sight of the main objectives.

And in the context of succession, certain kinds of insurance may be suitable once a plan's components become implemented.


One example is key-person insurance, a life-insurance product -- typically term insurance in force during the interval of an individual's anticipated length of service. This kind of policy reimburses the business for the loss or incapacity of whoever is considered uniquely valuable. These funds can then be used for interim expenses according to the plan of succession.

Succession planning likely is unfamiliar territory for many business owners, who may not even be aware that some guidelines and general principles exist. 


The federal Social Security Administration (SSA), in fact, has a free course posted online at 
www.ssa.gov/section218training/basic_course_8.htm.


"Management succession planning in the family company," SSA says, "requires focus on the four key departments present in any business of any size: administration and finance, operations and customer fulfillment, sales, and marketing."


The course then goes on to look at ownership succession planning, leadership development, and a host of questions such as "How do I start?"


By necessity, some of SSA's precepts are rather general so that they can be adapted for individual situations.

It is also rather practical, however: "Keep [the plan] plain and simple. Succession planning is more a mindset than a set of instructions. Therefore, don't overcomplicate the process by inundating it with steps and procedures."

 


About Victory State Bank

VSB Bancorp, Inc. (OTCQB: VSBN) is the one-bank holding company for Victory State Bank. As Staten Island, N.Y.’s only community-based commercial bank, Victory State Bank operates five full-service locations on the Island: The main office in the community of Great Kills, and branches in the communities of West Brighton, St. George, Dongan Hills and Rosebank.  For additional information, Victory State Bank may be reached at 718-979-1100 or visited online http://www.victorystatebank.com.

Media Contact: 

Relevant Public Relations, LLC

Headquarters: 718‑682‑1509

Mobile: 917‑715‑8761

Email:  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

 

Staten Island Commercial Bank Points To Free Advice

For Starting A Business

 

SI Small Business Development Center Guides New and Existing Business Owners

 to Greater Success

 

STATEN ISLAND, N.Y.  – If you are thinking about starting a business or need advice about running the one you already own, Victory State Bank suggests you explore the free services available on Staten Island.

There is variety of local organizations assisting entrepreneurs. One, for example, is the Staten Island Small Business Development Center (SI SBDC).

For new and existing entrepreneurs, the SI SBDC helps pave a path toward a successful business.  Many individuals seeking business guidance may find this to be somewhat of a challenge.  Those individuals who do take advantage of the Center’s resources improve their chances in owning a successful business.

This could mean helping you to: Define your goals; business plan assessment; financial analysis; marketing; loan assistance; paving a path to business ownership or business growth, and much more.

“The guidance we provide to clients who are new to the world of entrepreneurship fosters dreams into successful businesses,” said Dean L. Balsamini, director of the Staten Island SBDC. “However, it doesn’t end there. Even well-rooted operations need help from time to time, so our professional business advisers offer valuable assistance to help owners deal with unforeseen challenges and incorporate strategies for stability and growth.”

Providing counseling since 1993, the SI SBDC has assisted more than 6,700 businesses and generated more than $148 million for the Staten Island Community.   The SI SBDC has helped an extensive mix of businesses within a number of industries – and in a variety of ways. 

VENDING SERVICE

I have never left the [SI SBDC] office, or a seminar sponsored by the SBDC, not understanding their projects or services,” said Maryann Piazza, an owner of 20-year-old Majestic Vending Service, Tompskinsville.“The Small Business Development Center helped me to write a business plan and migrate through the system post-Sandy. They were a sounding board for me and were extremely helpful. They were the first to help me connect with the SBA and get help after the storm.”

CONCRETE CORING, SAWING

Kathleen Makowski, Vice President of JP Hogan, Coring and Sawing Corp., Bloomfield, sought the SI SBDC’s guidance for help in growing her business.

 “I am so pleased I came across the Small Business Development Center,” Ms. Makowski said. “I wanted to get more involved in a business-development program but found myself always caught up in the day-to-day operations of my company. The advisors at SBDC helped me prepare for my interview for my pending Women Minority Business application. They also worked hard to help me reorganize after being impacted by Sandy. The business advisors always point me in the right direction to do the right things and go down the right avenue.”

RESTAURANT BUSINESS

When the operators of Maizal’s Restaurant decided to expand their enterprise, (co-owners Leonel Zalaya and Chef Wilmer Alejandro Santos called on the experts at the SI SBDC for assistance. Launching in 2010 in Rosebank, Staten Island, the restaurant opened a successful second location in Astoria, Queens in 2014.

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTING

When Walsh Electrical Contracting launched in 1976, the Staten Island-headquartered company began the process of applying for Woman Business Enterprise (WBE) status in 2012; the official recognition denotes that a woman (or women) has majority ownership and control of a business entity.

Linda Walsh, CEO, who founded the company with her late husband, Kevin, and Ryan Walsh, President, achieved WBE status for her enterprise with guidance from SI SBDC Certified Senior Business Advisor Edward Piszko. The SI SBDC later helped Mrs. Walsh obtain assistance in SBA financing which assisted her in the relocation of her business, obtaining larger contracts, and further developing her business. 

“This is what the Staten Island Small Business Development Center is all about,” Balsamini said. “On the surface, onlookers see a business. But the reality is behind every business there are people striving to fulfill a dream. We take this very seriously and we do everything in our power to ensure their ambitions are more than satisfied.”

About the Staten Island Small Business Development Center

The Staten Island Small Business Development Center, located at the College of Staten Island is part of the New York State Small Business Development Center, which is administered by the State University of New York.

The center operates as a full-time enterprise during weekday business hours, assisting small businesses and aspiring entrepreneurs with a wide array of cost-free confidential guidance and technical assistance.

The Staten Island SBDC is located at: The College of Staten Island, 2800 Victory Blvd., Building 3A, Room 105; Staten Island, NY10314-9806.

The Staten Island SBDC additionally operates two outreach sites: The Small Business Development Center, Bay Ridge Satellite Office, in the Santander Building, 9512 Third Ave., Brooklyn, NY 11209, and the Small Business Development Center, Staten Island Office, in the Empire State Bank Building, 1361 North Railroad Ave., Staten Island, NY 10306.

For information about business counseling on Staten Island, the SI SBDC can be reached at 718-982-2560, or via email at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. . The Brooklyn office can be contacted at 718-619-5603; the Staten Island satellite office can be reached at 718-873-4496.

 

 

About Victory State Bank

VSB Bancorp, Inc. (OTCQB: VSBN) is the one-bank holding company for Victory State Bank. As Staten Island, N.Y.’s only community-based commercial bank, Victory State Bank operates five full-service locations on the Island: The main office in the community of Great Kills, and branches in the communities of West Brighton, St. George, Dongan Hills and Rosebank.  For additional information, Victory State Bank may be reached at 718-979-1100 or visited online at www.victorystatebank.com.

Media Contact:  

Relevant Public Relations, LLC

Headquarters: 718‑682‑1509

Mobile: 917‑715‑8761

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

 

 

 

Small-Business Optimism Rises

Staten Island business bank notes index's positive indicators 



STATEN ISLAND, N.Y.  -- Today's release of owners' outlook for expansion and for general business conditions was welcomed by Victory State Bank for what it may foretell.


The  National Federation of Independent Business (NFIB) and Small Business Economic Trends (SBET) survey, which polls NFIB members, looks at several indicators like hiring, sales, and wages, among others.

 

EMPLOYMENT UP

NFIB said owners increased employment by an average of 0.01 workers per firm in July (seasonally adjusted), the 10th positive month in a row and the best string of gains since 2006.  Seasonally adjusted, 13 percent of the owners (up 1 point) reported adding an average of 2.9 workers per firm over the past few months.  Offsetting that, 12 percent reduced employment (down 1 point) an average of 2.7 workers, producing the seasonally adjusted net gain of 0.01 workers per firm overall. 

The remaining 75 percent of owners made no net change in employment. Fifty-three percent of the owners hired or tried to hire in the last three months and 42 percent reported few or no qualified applicants for open positions.  

Twenty-four percent of all owners reported job openings they could not fill in the current period, down 2 points, but a solid reading.  Fifteen percent reported using temporary workers, up 1 point.

 Job-creation plans continued to strengthen and rose 1 percent to a seasonally adjusted net 13 percent, the best reading since September, 2007.   Not seasonally adjusted, 16 percent plan to increase employment at their firm (down 2 points), and 6 percent plan reductions (up 1 point).  On a seasonally adjusted basis, job creation plans improved and job openings held at a solid level. Actual job creation remained positive, although modestly so. 

The net percent of all owners (seasonally adjusted) reporting higher nominal sales in the past three months compared to the prior three months fell 1 point to a net negative 3 percent,  still one of the very best readings since 2007. Thirteen percent cited weak sales as their top business problem, one of the lowest readings since December 2007, the peak of the expansion. Expected real sales volumes posted a 1 point decline, falling to a net 10 percent of owners expecting gains. 

PROFIT IMPROVEMENT

Earnings trends were unchanged at a net negative 18 percent (net percent reporting quarter to quarter earnings trending higher or lower), one of the best readings since 2007. Rising labor costs are keeping pressure on earnings, but there appears to be an improvement in profit trends in place, even if not historically strong. This is one of the best readings since mid-2007 with the exception of a few months in early 2012 when the economy posted decent growth rates for several quarters.

Two percent reported reduced worker compensation and 24 percent reported raising compensation, yielding a seasonally adjusted net 21 percent reporting higher worker compensation, unchanged and the second best reading since the first quarter of 2008. A net seasonally adjusted 14 percent plan to raise compensation in the coming months (up 1 point). The reported gains in compensation are now solidly in the range typical of an economy with solid growth.


BETTER CREDIT CONDITIONS

Six percent of the owners reported that all their credit needs were not met, unchanged and only 2 points above the record low. Thirty percent reported all credit needs met, and 52 percent explicitly said they did not want a loan. Only 2 percent reported that financing was their top business problem compared to 22 percent citing taxes, 22 percent citing regulations and red tape and 13 percent citing weak sales. 

The net percent of owners expecting credit conditions to ease in the coming months was a seasonally adjusted negative 5 percent; more owners expect that it will be “harder” to arrange financing than easier (a 2 point improvement). This is the most favorable reading about credit market conditions since 2006, occurring at a time when the Fed is terminating its aggressive QE3 policy.  


CONSERVATIVE INVENTORIES

The pace of inventory reduction was steady, with a net negative 3 percent of all owners reporting growth in inventories (seasonally adjusted).  So, on balance, more firms are reducing inventory than building stocks.

The net percent of owners viewing current inventory stocks as “too low” worsened 1 point to a net negative 3 percent, mild dissatisfaction which will depress inventory investment.

Sales trends continued to deteriorate a bit but remained near the best levels in the recovery, just historically weak. Expected real sales did not improve as well, and this contributed to less urgency to rebuild stocks. The net percent of owners planning to add to inventory stocks rose to a net 0 percent. While inventories have been building solidly at the national level, it appears that the small business sector is adding little to the accumulation of stocks reported in the GDP accounts and sales are too weak to produce much liquidation.

SELLING PRICES' UPTICK

Twelve percent of the NFIB owners reported reducing their average selling prices in the past 3 months (up 2 points), and 25 percent reported price increases (up 2 points).  Seasonally adjusted, the net percent of owners raising selling prices was a net 14 percent, unchanged from June and 15 percentage points higher than December. 

Twenty-three percent plan on raising average prices in the next few months (up 1 point) and  only 3 percent plan reductions (unchanged), far fewer than actually reported reductions in past prices. Seasonally adjusted, a net 22 percent plan price hikes (up a point and one of the highest readings since 2008).  If owners continue to be successful, the economy will see a bit more “inflation” as the price indices seem to be suggesting.

   

 

About Victory State Bank

VSB Bancorp, Inc. (OTCQB: VSBN) is the one-bank holding company for Victory State Bank. As Staten Island, N.Y.’s only community-based commercial bank, Victory State Bank operates five full-service locations on the Island: The main office in the community of Great Kills, and branches in the communities of West Brighton, St. George, Dongan Hills and Rosebank.  For additional information, Victory State Bank may be reached at 718-979-1100 or visited online http://www.victorystatebank.com.

Media Contact: 

Relevant Public Relations, LLC

Headquarters: 718‑682‑1509

Mobile: 917‑715‑8761

Email:  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.