2 Methods for Signing Individual Income Tax Returns Electronically

 

 

STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. – Do you know how to sign an electronic individual income tax return?

To provide taxpayers with an understanding of how this modern-age signature is applied, Victory State Bank, the only community-based business bank on Staten Island, is sharing the following information from the IRS:

As with an income tax return submitted to the IRS on paper, the taxpayer and paid preparer (if applicable) must sign an electronic income tax return.

Taxpayers must sign individual income tax returns electronically. There are currently two methods for signing individual income tax returns electronically: Self-Select PIN and Practitioner PIN. Each of these methods is described within this article.

Taxpayers must sign and date the Declaration of Taxpayer to authorize the origination of the electronic submission of the return to the IRS prior to the transmission of the return to IRS.

The Declaration of Taxpayer includes the taxpayers' declaration under penalties of perjury that the return is true, correct and complete, as well as the taxpayers' Consent to Disclosure.

The Consent to Disclosure authorizes the IRS to disclose information to the taxpayers' Providers.

Taxpayers authorize Intermediate Service Providers, Transmitters and Electronic Return Originators (EROs) to receive from the IRS an acknowledgement of receipt or reason for rejection of the electronic return, the reason for any delay in processing the return or refund and the date of the refund.

An ERO is the Authorized IRS e-file Provider that originates the electronic submission of a return to the IRS. The ERO is usually the first point of contact for most taxpayers filing a return using IRS e-file.

Taxpayers must sign a new declaration if the electronic return data on individual income tax returns is changed after taxpayers signed the Declaration of Taxpayer and the amounts differ by more than either $50 to "Total income" or "AGI," or $14 to "Total tax," "Federal income tax withheld," "Refund" or "Amount you owe."

ELECTRONIC SIGNATURE METHODS

There are two methods of signing individual income tax returns with an electronic signature available for use by taxpayers. Both methods allow taxpayers to use a Personal Identification Number (PIN) to sign the return and the Declaration of Taxpayer.

Self-Select PIN is one of these methods. The Self-Select PIN method requires taxpayers to provide their prior year Adjusted Gross Income (AGI) amount or prior year PIN for use by the IRS to authenticate the taxpayers. EROs should encourage taxpayers who do not have their original prior year AGI or PIN to seek that information from the preparer or software they used last year.  If they are unable to attain the AGI from those sources, the taxpayer should access Get Transcript on IRS.gov and order a transcript to obtain the AGI.

This method may be completely paperless if the taxpayers enter their own PINs directly into the electronic return record using key strokes after reviewing the completed return. Taxpayers may also authorize EROs to enter PINs on their behalf, in which case the taxpayers must review and sign a completed signature authorization form after reviewing the return. Also see IRS e-fileSignature Authorization below.

Practitioner PIN is the other method and it does not require the taxpayer to provide their prior year AGI amount or prior year PIN. When using this method, taxpayers must always appropriately sign a completed signature authorization form.

Taxpayers, who use the Practitioner PIN method and enter their own PINs in the electronic return record using key strokes after reviewing the completed return, must still appropriately sign the signature authorization form.

Regardless of the method of electronic signature used, taxpayers may enter their own PINs; EROs may select and enter the taxpayers’ PINs; or the software may generate the taxpayers’ PINs; in the electronic return. After reviewing the return, the taxpayers must agree by signing an IRS e-file signature authorization containing the PIN.

The following taxpayers are ineligible to sign individual income tax returns with an electronic signature using the Self-Select PIN:

  • Primary taxpayers under age sixteen who have never filed; and
  • Secondary taxpayers under age sixteen who did not file the prior tax year.

EROs should advise taxpayers to keep a copy of their completed tax return to assist with authentication in the subsequent year.

For more information about filing taxes, you may visit the IRS online.

 

 

ABOUT VICTORY STATE BANK

VSB Bancorp, Inc. (OTCQX: VSBN) is the one-bank holding company for Victory State Bank. As Staten Island, N.Y.’s only community-based commercial bank, Victory State Bank operates five full-service locations on the Island, including the main office in the community of Great Kills and branches in West Brighton, St. George, Dongan Hills and Rosebank.

A planned sixth branch, to be situated in Meiers Corners, has received both regulatory and building department approvals.

For additional information, Victory State Bank may be reached at 718-979-1100, or visited online at www.VictoryStateBank.com.

Media Contact: 

Relevant Public Relations, LLC

Headquarters: 718‑682‑1509

Mobile: 917‑715‑8761

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

 

7 Wise Ways to Use Your Tax Refund

 

​ Have you thought about what you might do with your tax refund?

According to the Internal Revenue Service, more than 70 percent of the nation’s taxpayers received a tax refund averaging nearly $3,000 in 2017 and will get a similar amount this year.

As Americans receive their refunds along with additional benefits coming from the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act passed in December, Victory State Bank is suggesting tax-refund recipients consider these seven tips from the American Bankers Association to help them use the money wisely:

 

1)      SAVE FOR EMERGENCIES

More than 60 percent of Americans are not prepared for unexpected expenses. You can prepare by opening or adding to a savings account that serves as an “emergency fund.” Ideally, it should hold about three-to-six months of living expenses in case of sudden financial hardships like losing your job or having to replace your car.

2)      PAY OFF DEBT

Pay down existing balances either by chipping away at loans with the highest interest rates or eliminating smaller debt first.

3)      SAVE FOR RETIREMENT, YOUR CHILD’S EDUCATION

      OR FUTURE HEALTH EXPENSES

Open or increase contributions to a tax-deferred savings plan like a 401(k) or an IRA. Your bank can help set up an IRA, while a 401(k) is employer-sponsored. Look into opening a tax-advantaged 529 education savings plan to ensure school expenses will be covered when your child reaches college age. Or save for future health expenses with tax-free dollars by investing in a Health Savings Account.

4)      PAY DOWN YOUR MORTGAGE OR STUDENT LOANS

Make an extra payment on your mortgage or student loans each year to save money on interest while reducing the term of your loans. Be sure to inform your lender that your extra payments should be applied to principal, not interest.

5)      INVEST SAFELY WITH U.S. SAVINGS BONDS

OR MUNICIPAL BONDS 

The U.S. Treasury allows for savings bond to be purchased using your tax refund for as little as $50. Savings bonds earn interest for a maximum of 30 years.

6)      INVEST IN YOUR CURRENT HOME

Use your refund to invest in home improvements that will pay you back in the long run by increasing the value of your home.  This can include small, cost-effective upgrades like energy-efficient appliances that will pay off in both the short and long term – and with tax credits (as long as Congress continues to renew the program). If you have more substantial renovations in mind, your bank can help with a home equity line of credit.

7)      DONATE TO CHARITY

The benefit is two-fold: Giving to charity will make a difference in your community, and you can also claim the tax deduction, if you itemize.

ABA also stressed the importance of lower-income workers filing a tax return—even if their income is too low to trigger any federal tax liability—in order to potentially claim the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC).  Depending on a recipient’s income, marital status and number of children, the EITC can result in a refund of up to $6,318 to help them ensure financial security. 

For more tips and resources on a variety of personal finance topics such as mortgages, credit cards, protecting your identity and saving for college, visit aba.com/Consumers.

 

 

ABOUT VICTORY STATE BANK

 

VSB Bancorp, Inc. (OTCQX: VSBN) is the one-bank holding company for Victory State Bank. As Staten Island, N.Y.’s only community-based commercial bank, Victory State Bank operates five full-service locations on the Island, including the main office in the community of Great Kills and branches in West Brighton, St. George, Dongan Hills and Rosebank.

A planned sixth branch, to be situated in Meiers Corners, has received both regulatory and building department approvals.

For additional information, Victory State Bank may be reached at 718-979-1100, or visited online at www.VictoryStateBank.com.

Media Contact: 

Relevant Public Relations, LLC

Headquarters: 718‑682‑1509

Mobile: 917‑715‑8761

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

 

 

 

5 Ways to Avoid a Travel Scam

 

If you are thinking about taking a vacation and a seemingly great offer comes your way, don’t leap at the opportunity before doing some research, advises Victory State Bank.

Although some travel deals are legitimate, others are concocted by scammers seeking to steal your money, the financial institution warns.

The only community-based business bank on Staten Island advises that you be aware of these four travel scam tactics before agreeing to a travel arrangement, as explained in the U.S. General Services Administration’s “Consumer Action Handbook”:

            1)      Phone calls or emails that say you have “won” a free vacation – but you must pay a service fee in order to claim it.

 

2)      Scammers call selling fake vacation packages, putting pressure on you to “act now” to get a very low price.

 

3)      You qualify for travel at a low price – but find out about additional fees or requirements to book a second trip at a higher price.

 

            4)      You prepay for a vacation package, but when it is time to travel, the reservation doesn’t exist.

 

5 WAYS TO PROTECT YOURSELF:

 

            1)      Don’t pay for “free” vacation prizes.

 

2)      Ask questions before buying vacation packages, including cancellation policies.

 

3)      Verify ticket numbers with the airlines, cruiselines, and hotels, not just the reservation with the travel agency.

 

4)      Don’t give in to pressure to buy now. Do your research beforehand.

 

    5)      Use credit cards to book travel, so that you can dispute charges for services you didn’t receive.

 

 

ABOUT VICTORY STATE BANK

VSB Bancorp, Inc. (OTCQX: VSBN) is the one-bank holding company for Victory State Bank. As Staten Island, N.Y.’s only community-based commercial bank, Victory State Bank operates five full-service locations on the Island, including the main office in the community of Great Kills and branches in West Brighton, St. George, Dongan Hills and Rosebank.

A planned sixth branch, to be situated in Meiers Corners, has received both regulatory and building department approvals.

For additional information, Victory State Bank may be reached at 718-979-1100, or visited online at www.VictoryStateBank.com.

Media Contact: 

Relevant Public Relations, LLC

Headquarters: 718‑682‑1509

Mobile: 917‑715‑8761

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

  

Justice Department, Partners Declare Largest Coordinated Sweep of Elder Fraud Cases in History

 

 

Victory State Bank, the only community-based business bank on Staten Island, is applauding the U.S. Department of Justice and law enforcement partners for their latest accomplishment in combating elder fraud.

On Thursday (Feb. 22), Attorney General Jeff Sessions and law enforcement partners announced the largest coordinated sweep of elder fraud cases in history. The cases involve more than two hundred and fifty defendants from around the globe who victimized more than a million Americans, most of whom were elderly. 

The cases include criminal, civil, and forfeiture actions across more than 50 federal districts. Of the defendants, 200 were charged criminally. 

In each case, offenders engaged in financial schemes that targeted or largely affected seniors. In total, the charged elder fraud schemes caused losses of more than half a billion dollars. The Department coordinated its announcement with the FTC and state Attorneys General, who independently filed numerous cases targeting elder frauds within the sweep period.

Attorney General Sessions was joined in the announcement by FBI Acting Deputy Director David Bowdich; Chief Postal Inspector Guy Cottrell; FTC Acting Chairman Maureen Ohlhausen; and Kansas Attorney General and President of the National Association of Attorneys General Derek Schmidt.

“The Justice Department and its partners are taking unprecedented, coordinated action to protect elderly Americans from financial threats, both foreign and domestic,” said Attorney General Sessions.  “Today’s actions send a clear message: We will hold perpetrators of elder fraud schemes accountable wherever they are.  When criminals steal the hard-earned life savings of older Americans, we will respond with all the tools at the Department’s disposal – criminal prosecutions to punish offenders, civil injunctions to shut the schemes down, and asset forfeiture to take back ill-gotten gains. Today is only the beginning. I have directed Department prosecutors to coordinate with both domestic law enforcement partners and foreign counterparts to stop these criminals from exploiting our seniors.”

The actions charged a variety of fraud schemes, ranging from mass mailing, telemarketing and investment frauds to individual incidences of identity theft and theft by guardians. A number of cases involved transnational criminal organizations that defrauded hundreds of thousands of elderly victims, while others involved a single relative or fiduciary who took advantage of an individual victim. The schemes charged in these cases caused losses to more than a million victims.

"Winners. That’s what so many of the people who received these solicitations in the mail thought they were. But they’re not. They are victims of scams that Postal Inspectors have seen and investigated for decades. In fact, some of the same operators we encountered 20 years ago are back. But so are we. Yesterday, Postal Inspectors around the country executed search warrants on 12 locations that some of these same operators used to run their scams. We’re letting the American public know – and especially our vulnerable older Americans – that Postal Inspectors are working hard to protect them and ensure their confidence in the U.S. Mail,” said Chief Postal Inspector Cottrell.

“Over the last year, the FBI has initiated more than 200 financial crimes cases involving elderly victims who were devastated financially, emotionally, mentally and physically. Picking up the pieces of these fraud schemes can be equally as traumatizing for the caregivers of these elderly victims,” said Acting Deputy Director Bowdich.  “The FBI reminds seniors and their caregivers to be vigilant. If any person believes they are the victim of, or have knowledge of fraud involving an elderly person, regardless of the loss amount, they should report it to the FBI.”

ELDER FRAUD COMPLAINTS

Elder fraud complaints may be filed with the FTC at 
www.ftccomplaintassistant.gov or at 877-FTC-HELP.  The Department of Justice provides a variety of resources relating to elder fraud victimization through its Office of Victims of Crime, which can be reached at www.ovc.gov

 

 

ABOUT VICTORY STATE BANK

VSB Bancorp, Inc. (OTCQX: VSBN) is the one-bank holding company for Victory State Bank. As Staten Island, N.Y.’s only community-based commercial bank, Victory State Bank operates five full-service locations on the Island, including the main office in the community of Great Kills and branches in West Brighton, St. George, Dongan Hills and Rosebank.

A planned sixth branch, to be situated in Meiers Corners, has received both regulatory and building department approvals.

For additional information, Victory State Bank may be reached at 718-979-1100, or visited online at www.VictoryStateBank.com.

Media Contact: 

Relevant Public Relations, LLC

Headquarters: 718‑682‑1509

Mobile: 917‑715‑8761

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

 

Business Bank on Staten Island Spotlights 7 Red Flags of a Ponzi Scheme

 

 

Victory State Bank is reminding consumers to beware of the ever-present threat of Ponzi schemes.

As explained by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, a Ponzi scheme is an investment fraud that pays existing investors with funds collected from new investors.

Ponzi scheme organizers often promise to invest your money and generate high returns with little or no risk. But in many Ponzi schemes, the fraudsters do not invest the money. Instead, they use it to pay those who invested earlier and may keep some for themselves.

With little or no legitimate earnings, Ponzi schemes require a constant flow of new money to survive. When it becomes hard to recruit new investors, or when large numbers of existing investors cash out, these schemes tend to collapse.

Ponzi schemes are named after Charles Ponzi, who duped investors in the 1920s with a postage stamp speculation scheme.

To help you avoid becoming a victim of such scams, Victory State Bank is sharing the following Ponzi Scheme warning signs as described the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission:

  • HIGH RETURNS WITH LITTLE OR NO RISK

Every investment carries some degree of risk, and investments yielding higher returns typically involve more risk. Be highly suspicious of any “guaranteed” investment opportunity.

  • OVERLY CONSISTENT RETURNS

Investments tend to go up and down over time. Be skeptical about an investment that regularly generates positive returns regardless of overall market conditions.

  • UNREGISTERED INVESTMENTS

Ponzi schemes typically involve investments that are not registered with the SEC or with state regulators. Registration is important because it provides investors with access to information about the company’s management, products, services, and finances.

  • UNLICENSED SELLERS

Federal and state securities laws require investment professionals and firms to be licensed or registered. Most Ponzi schemes involve unlicensed individuals or unregistered firms.

  • SECRETIVE, COMPLEX STRATEGIES

Avoid investments if you don’t understand them or can’t get complete information about them.

  • ISSUES WITH PAPERWORK

Account statement errors may be a sign that funds are not being invested as promised.

  • DIFFICULTY RECEIVING PAYMENTS

Be suspicious if you don’t receive a payment or have difficulty cashing out. Ponzi scheme promoters sometimes try to prevent participants from cashing out by offering even higher returns for staying put.

 

 

 

VSB Bancorp, Inc. (OTCQX: VSBN) is the one-bank holding company for Victory State Bank. As Staten Island, N.Y.’s only community-based commercial bank, Victory State Bank operates five full-service locations on the Island, including the main office in the community of Great Kills and branches in West Brighton, St. George, Dongan Hills and Rosebank.

A planned sixth branch, to be situated in Meiers Corners, has received both regulatory and building department approvals.

For additional information, Victory State Bank may be reached at 718-979-1100, or visited online at www.VictoryStateBank.com.

Media Contact: 

Relevant Public Relations, LLC

Headquarters: 718‑682‑1509

Mobile: 917‑715‑8761

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.